Monday, July 20, 2009

Getting a water supply to the shed

There are many different trades you can pursue from your garden office. Some, such as potters and dyers, need more water than, say, journalists. One reader of Shedworking has written in looking for some help:
"I need water and power. Not much power, Mac, printer, lights, microwave and spindryer. Crucially I need water. I'm wondering about a Shepherd's Hut but the water is a puzzle. In theory I could use a water butt to provide it, plus emptying the tumble dryer and collecting the the cold water in the shower before it gets hot enough to go under the water generates a bucket a day).

It's the drainage... If I had a sink which drained into a second water butt that might work. There's nothing awful in the water, just water and a trace of vinegar (probably good for the rhodedendrons). Have you got any ideas? In theory I could connect it to the mains with a hosepipe but it's a bit of a faff. I really don't want to be messing with the water board about drainage."
Any thoughts readers?

Photo by Peter Lindberg

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6 comments:

  1. If you don't want to connect to mains drainage and the only thing you want to get rid of is water with a small amount of vinegar then you should consider a soakaway.

    The size and viability of this will depend on the sub-soil in your area. If you have clay then it will be a non-starter (clay takes a long time to absorb any water). You can do a bit of a test by digging a hole say 1m deep filling it with water and seeing how long it takes to empty (if the water doesn't gradually soakaway then you have a clay soil and a new pond!)

    A simple soakaway can be formed by lining the hole with a geotextile and then filling the hole with a single size gravel.

    The overall size and depth of hole you will need depends on how much water you need to dispose of daily and how porous the sub-soil is.

    Regards

    John
    secrets-of-shed-building.com

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  2. The comment's I've heard about soakways are two fold.

    1) Don't put them too close to the shed or it might cause subsidance.

    2) Use larger sized gravel/rocks so that it does not get quickly blocked up with leaves etc.

    You could check the pH of the water to see if the vinegar is significant or not.

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  3. Nina S4:02 PM

    We built our garden shed almost 15 years ago, and had the first "shed party". Now, having become an annual event,"The Shed party" has become an institution among our friends and their friends and their kids friends. Improvised partying in sheds...you can shed your clothes, your inhibitions etc.....

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  4. Here is information about sheds.It will help you sure. Shed Plans

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  5. Vinegar, in the 10 to 20 percent solutions not the normal household 5 percent solution, is a plant killer.
    I would consider thinking of environmental issues around your building.
    What you can do, which the Fin's do all the time, is dig out a hole , get a oil drum,making sure you anti rust proof it before lowering it in to the hole( paint it in antirust paint), put lots of very small holes in it, then, fill it 3/4 with sawdust,, making sure the small holes are also 3/4 of the way up from the bottom, them pour your waste on this. It will filter out most crap! Then after about a year/ 2 years, bring the barrel to the surface and pour petrol and burn, then start the process again. This is how to get rid of toilet waste as well.

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  6. Anonymous3:58 PM

    Nice post.

    ReplyDelete