Friday, September 22, 2017

Mini Living Urban Cabin


The dividing line between garden offices and tiny homes is decreasing all the time, and the blur between where we work and where we live continues to grow (but in a good way). This compact micro-house from Mini Living measures 15 sqm and has been one of the hit talking points of the 2017 London Design Festival this week. According to the designers "the design is inspired by London’s rich history of geometric facades" and their goal was "to create a house with limited space that is inspired by local surroundings. The general idea behind the cabin is to help address the need to live in a constantly growing city without having to compromise on quality or a unique urban landscape". They continue:
The kitchen for example, a space where people come together and traditions thrive, has been created with London’s food markets in mind, aiming to bring their culture and diversity into the home. It has been designed with versatility in mind; the table can spontaneously be moved outside to take advantage of warmer weather.
Built by Aldworth James & Bond and designed by architect Sam Jacob it also has its own microlibrary because according to Jacob: “London is a city of books before it is a city of architecture. We created this library as an extension to domestic space that contains a certain spirit of the city. Recalling the grand libraries as well as the book-lined studies of domestic life.”

The next Urban Cabin will be unveiled in October in New York, where it will be home to various events and workshops looking at the development of the Urban Cabin into an inhabitable concept for major cities in 2018.


Photography by Tom Donald

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Friday posts are sponsored by Warwick Buildings, manufacturers of outstanding quality timber buildings. Click here for more information.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Team UnLimbited: Shedworkers


The Shed of the Year competition throws up some amazing builds. It also brings some even more astonishing shed-based stories to a wider public eye. And this year, it's the story behind Team UnLimbited and the selfless work of Drew Murray and Stephen Davies, winners of the workshop and studio category.
In short, they make 3D-printed limbs for children in need across the world. The videos below explain in more detail: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thursday posts are sponsored by Cabin Master: garden offices and studios to fit any size garden. Top quality contemporary or traditional buildings.

A garden office you can live in


The Nugget micro home from Modern Tiny Living is not strictly a garden office, but if you want something portable that you can work in with added extras, this is probably about as small as you would want to get (at 102 sq ft or 9.5 sq m on a 12ft trailer). Inside there's a composting toilet and 30 inch x 30 inch shower, a mini-fridge and hickory butcher block countertops. It's designed to be off-grid with a 100 gallon fresh water tank solar batteries/panels, and a propane tankless water heater. Marketed more as a "weekend getaway or travel companion", living here full time (especially without a cooker) would be tricky.


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Thursday posts are sponsored by Cabin Master: garden offices and studios to fit any size garden. Top quality contemporary or traditional buildings.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Black garden office



Black is an unusual colour for a garden office but the Sportskabin range is proving popular among customers of Garden2office. "This one has a sedum roof, a store room and  triple glazing," explains Garden2office's owner Mark Ramuz. "The client imports Scandinavian crafts, so specified a stripped back interior to complete the Nordic look."

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Wednesday posts are sponsored by The Stable Company®, the UK's premier supplier of garden offices and garden rooms. Click here

How your garden office could earn you money


An interesting piece by eDEN Garden Rooms suggests that one way of making money from your garden room/office is simply renting it out, not for business using sites such as Vrumi or SpaceHop, but as a holiday let. Here's a snippet about the rent-a-room tax free allowance
By signing up to the rent-a-room scheme, you not only make money on your rental, but you are also eligible to earn up to £7,500 per year, tax free. Remember, before you decide to proceed that being part of the scheme means that you are not able to claim any expenses related to the letting. You should therefore make sure that you do some calculations beforehand on any possible maintenance and general upkeep that may be required, to check whether you’d be better-off financially in or out of the scheme. Before you take a lodger in, you should always check with your mortgage provider and home insurer to make sure that you are keeping within the terms of any existing contracts. If you rent, you’ll also need to check that your lease allows you to take on a lodger.
eDEN do point out that you need to think it all through carefully e.g. getting planning permission for an ‘independent separate dwelling’, ensuring you have full building regulations in place, etc.

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Wednesday posts are sponsored by The Stable Company®, the UK's premier supplier of garden offices and garden rooms. Click here

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Caitlin Moran: Shedworker


Memoirist, novelist and cultural commentator Caitlin Moran is also a shedworker (you can see her garden office in the background of the photo above). Here she is talking about it in The Guardian:
I finally “invested” in an office/shed at the bottom of the garden, which is where I now spend most of my day. Before, I used to work on the patio, because of the smoking. Man, I have sat out there in some grim weathers... After a long day of work, it’s great to give my arse a break by walking from the bottom of the garden to the front room, and then sitting on the sofa until 10pm.
And this week in The Times (paywall, sorry):
Downstairs in the sweet September morning, cup of tea in hand, open the back door, head to the writing shed, everything to live for, and WHAMMO. Spider in the face. A 12ft web around the head, tea everywhere and eight arachnid eyes peevishly staring into mine, going, “I’m sorry. Did you want to use that door? It’s just I thought I’d pop a face trap over it. Because it’s spider-in-the-face season.”
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Tuesday posts are sponsored by Garden Spaces, suppliers of contemporary garden buildings, offices, gyms and studios, many of which do not require planning

Early years school shedworking


As we frequently say on Shedworking, children need sheds too. Here's a lovely example from Rotunda Roundhouses, a 6.5m Rotunda with sedum roof that will be used at an early years school. Already christened 'Saplings', it took just seven days to get into place and Rotunda used social media to chart the build (we've put them in reverse order).
Tuesday posts are sponsored by Garden Spaces, suppliers of contemporary garden buildings, offices, gyms and studios, many of which do not require planning

Monday, September 18, 2017

Shed of the year 2017: The Mushroom Shed


To the online shouts of 'But that's not a shed', this year's Shed of the Year has been announced after nearly 3,000 entries and 27,000 votes - Ben Swanborough’s kind of tree house The Mushroom Shed from Surrey was awarded the prize after his young daughter gave him £500 of her own money to make a hang-out space in the shape of a mushroom.

Uncle Wilco, founder of Shed of the Year said: “The bar was set really high this year, from entire train carriages to a miniature chapel and a replica cinema. With strong contenders winning all eight category awards it was a really tough decision for me and my fellow judges. Ben’s dedication to his daughter and the quirky design details he created really stood out above the rest and he thoroughly deserves the title!”

More details and photos at Shedblog. --------------------------------------------------------------------
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Is it worth getting a garden office?


Each week in The Guardian newspaper's 'Money' section, a reader asks a question and other readers respond to it to help them out. This week's is 'Is it worth getting a garden shed?' and replies will be printed in next week's issue. The full question is:
I want to spend about £25,000 on a garden office, which I’ll use for freelance work and as a place for hobbies. My wife thinks it’s a silly price for a shed that will take a chunk of the garden; I think it will add value. Do those with a studio regret it or love it?
You can let the Guardian know your thoughts at money@theguardian.com

Image: Booths Garden Studios
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Monday posts are sponsored by garden2office, the Swedish garden office specialists. Click here for more details.