Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Rotating garden office cabin


As regular readers will know, the Shedworking staff are suckers for a rotating shedlike atmosphere and Telmo Cadavez's micro cabin - as featured on Tiny House Talk - is a beauty. Inspired by Portuguese wagons, it is made out of pine wood, cork (insulation) and covered with black slate, with quite a simple interior that features a double bed. Overall it's 8 m2. If you want to try one out, you can hire it on a visit to the Montesinho natural park. The video below shows it rotating. ----------------------------------------------------
Wednesday posts are sponsored by The Stable Company®, the UK's premier supplier of garden offices and garden rooms. Click here

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

KantoorKaravaan: Shedworking in the woods


KantoorKaravaan is an intriguing garden office project based in the Netherlands. A project by The Tipping Point Foundation, it's a series of mobile off-grid workplaces that tour National Parks and other rural areas, but still offers wi-fi, a kitchen, and compost lavatories (and a coffee-maker), all run off solar. There are apparently plans to expand into the rest of Europe and the US.

Founder Tom van de Beek told Fast Company: "These times of technological innovation and wireless connectivity provide us with the ultimate combination: getting back to nature and self sufficiency in terms of food and energy, and still be able to do our day to day business. In other words, we can now create the 21st-century equivalent of the Garden of Eden." -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tuesday posts are sponsored by Garden Spaces, suppliers of contemporary garden buildings, offices, gyms and studios, many of which do not require planning

Monday, June 27, 2016

Man Cave - She Shed - Garden Office

An excellent timelapse of the building of Angus McGregor's garden office project over nine months. Most of the building was put together using recycled materials and much of it by Angus himself. --------------------------------------------------------------------
Monday posts are sponsored by garden2office, the Swedish garden office specialists. Click here for more details.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Visible Studio



A lovely two storey garden office by Invisible Studio made using untreated and unseasoned timber taken from the woodland in which it is built. Visible Studio is reached via a bridge. Interestingly, nobody who worked on the project had constructed a building before. Here's what Invisible Studio says about it:
The project was an exercise in establishing a system of building that could be constructed by unskilled labour, with minimal drawings, allowing ad hoc discoveries and improvisation to be embraced, and the tyranny of predetermined design to be escaped. The ‘mistakes’ of the unskilled team remain evident in the building, and no attempt was made to conceal them.
The scaffolding need for the build was then used to make the bridge, the windows were taken from a skip, and it is heated by waste wood from the woodland.Photos: Andy Matthews and Piers Taylor
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Friday posts are sponsored by Warwick Buildings, manufacturers of outstanding quality timber buildings. Click here for more information.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

European Men's Sheds


menssheds.eu helps support the development of Men’s Sheds and Men’s Sheds Associations throughout Europe. Regular readers will know that while the Men’s Sheds movement started in Australia it has spread to Europe and there are now national associations for the UK, and individual ones for Ireland, Scotland and Wales. There are also plans underway to set up Men’s Sheds in Holland, Sweden, Finland and  Spain.
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Thursday posts are sponsored by Cabin Master: garden offices and studios to fit any size garden. Top quality contemporary or traditional buildings.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Hutmaker: Sheds and temples


Hutmaker is a new name in the world of garden offices and other shedlike atmospheres, or as they put it: "We make huts. And hideaways and places to party. Think-tanks and hermitages, love shacks and temples. Places to keep things in and space to let things go."

Pictured above is the Leaf Pavilion - ebony stained and treated timber patterned roof with cedar caps with a solid timber frame and floor. The CNC patterned wall panels come in half a dozen colour options and the whole thing is 5ft x 5ft x 8ft high to comply with planning regulations. Below is the slightly more oblong Birdsong Pavilion.


They also do really nice benches and arbours.


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Wednesday posts are sponsored by The Stable Company®, the UK's premier supplier of garden offices and garden rooms. Click here

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Rooftop garden office: Urban House


We've been writing about rooftop shedworking for years and Berkeley Homes new design - Urban House - suggests we may be seeing a lot more garden offices up in the air. The new design is a three-storey house, but with a private roof garden instead of a back garden (which means they can build twice as many homes as previously on a site). The first Urban Homes are up and running at Kidbrooke Village in Greenwich, London, and more will be up soon at Green Park Village in Reading. Its a modular build which means each house comes on the back of a lorry and takes just a few weeks to build. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tuesday posts are sponsored by Garden Spaces, suppliers of contemporary garden buildings, offices, gyms and studios, many of which do not require planning

MoonDragon: half shed, half house


Some marvellous mobile tiny house designs by American tiny house specialist Zyl Vardos including the MoonDragon (above - more interior pictures here) and the Ark (below). MoonDragon is 4m x 2.7m x 7.3m), clad in Onduvilla shingles, with walls made from mahogany ply, a cork floor is cork, and cedar tongue and groove ceiling.


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Tuesday posts are sponsored by Garden Spaces, suppliers of contemporary garden buildings, offices, gyms and studios, many of which do not require planning

Monday, June 20, 2016

Wearables in the garden office workplace


The use of wearables in the workplace is not developing because of a lack of trust as people worry that their employer may use the data against them and not for their benefit, according to new PwC research.


Workers who would be happy to use a wearable device at work are most likely to want to trade their personal data in exchange for flexible working hours, free health screening and health and fitness incentives. Two thirds of respondents want their employer to help them to become more active.

The younger generation of millennial workers are the most comfortable sharing their personal data. Despite privacy concerns, six in 10 would be happy to use a work-supplied smartwatch and this rises to seven in 10 if they’re getting a better work deal in return. This compares to only three in 10 of workers aged 55 and over.

Technology such as a virtual reality headset, that doesn’t require the sharing of personal information but does offer benefits to workers such as facilitating collaboration whilst working from home, would be attractive to almost half of the workforce and six out of ten millennials.

Overall, only 46% of people surveyed say they would accept a free piece of wearable technology if their employers had access to the data recorded.

Even if this information is collected in exchange for workplace benefits, such as flexible working hours and working from different locations, the number of people who would use a wearable device at work rises to only just over half.
“Despite more people owning wearable devices, many people are still reluctant to use them in the workplace due to trust issues. Employers haven’t been able to overcome the ‘big brother’ reaction from people to sharing their personal data. Digital tools and analytics advances could be the key to unlocking a more engaged, happy and higher performing workforce - but first employers must gain the trust and confidence of their people to acquire, store and use personal data appropriately. If employers want to overcome the trust gap they need to show that they are serious about data security and communicate openly with their staff about the benefits for them.” 
Anthony Bruce, people analytics leader at PwC
Data privacy is the main barrier for those workers unwilling to share their information. Four in 10 say they don’t fully trust their employer to use it for their benefit and just over a third say they don’t trust their employer not to use the data against them in some way. Monday posts are sponsored by garden2office, the Swedish garden office specialists. Click here for more details.