Thursday, October 18, 2018

A short guide to buying a garden room


If you're thinking of buying a garden office, this short guide from eDEN Garden Rooms is a useful place to start. It takes a whirlwind look at specs, inspiration, size, and planning permission. Here's a snippet:
"Think about how you will want to live in your space and work backwards from there. By creating a bespoke design that is individually tailored to suit you, you’ll ensure that you get the very most out of your investment and the space will work in harmony with your lifestyle. For example, you may wish to integrate hidden storage solutions, reinforced flooring, a wet room, extra windows or doors, or any else you can dream of. Don’t fall into the trap of buying off-the-shelf when your garden room should be as unique as you are!"
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Thursday posts are sponsored by Cabin Master: garden offices and studios to fit any size garden. Top quality contemporary or traditional buildings.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Turning a railway carriage into a garden office


Here is the early stage of an intriguing renovation build by garden designer and novelist Chris O'Donoghue. Essentially, he's turning the Victorian railway carriage facade that featured in his 2007 Silver-Gilt-winning design at Chelsea Flower Show, but has since been unused, into a studio and writing room. More atmospheric pictures at the link above. One to watch.
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Wednesday posts are sponsored by Eurodita, the leader in serving smart dealers

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Cabin of 3D Printed Curiosities



A remarkable shedlike atmosphere from the Emerging Objects studio which is part of their ongoing examination of microarchitecture in San Francisco's Bay Area. The front facade features a mass of succulents in ceramic planters while the others are covered in a 3D-printed ceramic cladding system which is inspired by knitting techniques. Inside, there are Chroma Curl wall tiles to add light. Here's what the designer say:
The Cabin of 3D Printed Curiosities demonstrates that 3D printing can be beautiful, meaningful, and well crafted – not crude, fast and cheap. Much like the garage makerspace movement, the backyard building space might become a platform where new ways of living are tested, new technologies can be invented and tested, and new materials can be discovered.
Click the link above for more information from the studio and here for Treehugger's take on its eco credentials.

Photos: Matthew Millman -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tuesday posts are sponsored by Garden Spaces, suppliers of contemporary garden buildings, offices, gyms and studios, many of which do not require planning

Monday, October 15, 2018

Shedworkers battle against working from home pressures


Around 46 per cent of shedworkers and other homeworkers feel the need to prove they are actually working while working from home rather than mucking around, according to a study by LogMeIn.

In their global poll of 3,000 including 500 UK workers, people working from home said they felt pressured to be more responsive on email (36%) and working longer hours (23%). At the same time, nearly a third said they worked more efficiently from hom and wasted more time when in traditionals offices talking to colleagues or spending unproductive hours online (although one in four admitted that pets, family, neighbours and the television distracted them while working from home).

“This points to a clear problem within the culture of UK businesses and ultimately reduces productivity. My advice to businesses would be: trust your employees to do the job and don’t miss the opportunity to improve their wellbeing,” said Steve Duignan, VP international marketing at LogMeIn. 

Despite the extra stigma they felt, just under a third of people still said they felt happier while working from home because of more flexibility in breaks, ending the commute, and focusing on their tasks, and a better general work-life balance. Around a quarter said they worked in their pyjamas which seems a very high figure to the Shedworking team.

Image courtesy Cabin Master -------------------------------------------------
Monday posts are sponsored by garden2office, the Swedish garden office specialists. Click here for more details.

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Inside Dylan Thomas's writing shed (video)


A lovely five minute video of designer William Hardie exploring the writing shed which belonged to Dylan Thomas. Although there are lots of photos of it around, there are very few videos of what it's like to be inside, so this is a treat.

DYLANTHOMAS SHED from Richard Carr on Vimeo. ------------------------------------
Sunday posts are sponsored by eDEN Garden Rooms. Stunning, bespoke high quality garden rooms, to suit your unique space and style

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Shelf Life


As some of you know, away from the world of shedworking, I also write books (frequently on bookish subjects). The latest is out today, Shelf Life, published by The British Library. Here is some bumph about it:
Books; reading, collecting and the physical housing of them has brought the book-lover joy – and stress – for centuries. Fascinated writers have tried to capture the particular relationships we form with our library, and the desperate troubles we will undergo to preserve it.With Alex Johnson as your guide, immerse yourself in this eclectic anthology and hear from an iconic Prime Minister musing over the best way to store your books and an illustrious US President explaining the best works to read outdoors. Enjoy serious speculations on the psychological implications of reading from a 19th century philosopher, and less serious ones concerning the predicament of dispensing with unwanted volumes or the danger of letting children (the ‘enemies of books’) near your collection
Available from all good bookshops (please buy local if at all possible) as well as the usual suspects online.
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Thursday posts are sponsored by Cabin Master: garden offices and studios to fit any size garden. Top quality contemporary or traditional buildings.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

'His and hers' garden offices case study


An excellent case study on Coconut focuses on Maggie Johnson, Director and Client Liaison at Essex-based Executive Virtual Services, whose garden office is pictured above. She talks us through her reasons for going down the shedworking route, as she explains:
In April 2015 my ‘shed office’ was built, and it has made a huge impact on the growth and success of my business ever since.  Working in this way gives me the space and time to develop, without the distractions of everyday life. I have a team of VAs working with me now (sometimes from my office), and clients can come and meet with me here too.
So successful in fact that her husband has now followed suit with his own shoffice (below). Well worth a read via the link above.


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Wednesday posts are sponsored by Eurodita, the leader in serving smart dealers

Tuesday, October 09, 2018

Shipping container garden office




The Randy Bens Architecture practice in Canada embraced the shedworking ethic when it made a recent move to expand, not into a traditional office but to a garden office built from a larger than normal corten stell shipping container, reduced from 40′ to 28' long, 11.5′ wide and 9.5′ tall.

It has yellow cedar cladding on the outside and birch plywood lining on the inside where there is the studio work space, a small kitchen, and a bathroom. There is also a rather nice large picture window at one end and the whole thing cantilevers off the foundation. Below is an excellent short video of the office being delivered.
 Photographs by Ema Peter

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Tuesday posts are sponsored by Garden Spaces, suppliers of contemporary garden buildings, offices, gyms and studios, many of which do not require planning

Monday, October 08, 2018

Allan Ahlberg: My Worst Book Ever


We featured illustrator Allan Ahlberg on Shedworking several years ago, but we were especially delighted with his recent book  My Worst Book Ever! in collaboration with Bruce Ingram. His writing shed features heavily as the spreads below indicate, including the familiar issue of spilling coffee all over his work as well as perhaps less common snail issues. A delight for all readers and a good way to get younger readers to appreciate the joys of a garden office.



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Monday posts are sponsored by garden2office, the Swedish garden office specialists. Click here for more details.